Austin Geological Society
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MEETING LOCATION
(Unless otherwise noted)


Building 130: The Bureau of Economic Geology
10100 Burnet Road
Austin, Texas 78758



AGS CONTACT INFORMATION

Austin Geological Society
P.O. Box 1302
Austin, TX
78767-1302

Email Contact:
President@austingeosoc.org

The Austin Geological Society Mission:

  • to stimulate interest in and promote advancement of geology;
  • to facilitate discussion and dissemination of geologic information;
  • to encourage social and professional cooperation among geologists and associated scientists;
  • to enhance public understanding of the professional activities of the members.

Upcoming Meetings & Events


Dec 1st, 2014 (Mon)
  AGS Meeting December 1st at 6:30pm
Cave Night!
Ernie Lundelius – “Contributions of Caves to Knowledge of Edwards Plateau History”
Chris Bell – “New Ice-age fossils from Phillips Cave, Crockett County, Texas”
Bureau of Economic Geology
10100 Burnet Rd., ROC conference room
Austin, Texas
Dec 3rd, 2014 (Wed)
  CORE WORKSHOP - BUDA, EAGLE FORD, AUSTIN & WOODBINE FORMATIONS
DATE: Wednesday, December 3, 2014
TIME: 8:30 a.m. to ~4:00 p.m.
PLACE: Bureau of Economic Geology,
Pickle Research Campus, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin 78758,
Buildings 130 & 131 – Core and Sample Repository
PRESENTERS: Bob Loucks, Steve Ruppel, Harry Rowe, Bill Ambrose, Greg
Frebourg and Jiemin Lu
COST: $25
Includes workshop notes, continental breakfast, boxed lunch
SPECIFY IF VEGETARIAN
REGISTER: MAXIMUM OF 40 PARTICIPANTS
Contact Charlotte Sullivan, Phone: 512-809-0656
E-mail: charlotte.sullivan@pnnl.gov

This core workshop will focus on cored intervals from the Upper Cretaceous of the South Texas shelf including the Buda, Eagle Ford, Austin, and Woodbine formations. Also on display will be age-equivalent cores from Louisiana (Tuscaloosa Fm) and Colorado (Niobrara Fm). The goal of the workshop will be to illustrate the variable characteristics of these rocks, the causes of these variations, and the state-of-the-art methods needed to accurately characterize them including X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, isotope chemistry, SEM imaging, and U-Pb ash bed dating.
Dec 13th, 2014 (Sat)
  AGS Fall/Winter Field Trip – EVAPORITE KARST, EDWARDS GROUP, JUNCTION AREA
DATE: Saturday, December 13, 2014
DEPARTURE TIME: 7:30 a.m. (return – 6:30 to 7:00 p.m.)
ASSEMBLY POINT: Bee Cave, 12400 W. Highway 71 – meet the bus in
HEB parking lot – SE quadrant of the parking area
LEADERS: Bob Loucks, Chris Zahm
COST: $60
Includes water/soft drinks and guidebook:
Evaporite Paleokarst: Karst Models for Evaporite
Dissolution without Clastic Input: Lower
Cretaceous Edwards Group
Does not include lunch – please bring your own lunch.
REGISTER: With Field Trip Committee at November 3 AGS meeting
OR
Contact Charlotte Sullivan, Phone: 512-809-0656
E-mail: charlotte.sullivan@pnnl.gov

The dissolution of a thick evaporite sequence is a large-scale diagenetic feature that affects thousands of square kilometers and produces intrastratal deformation within the interval of the former evaporite bed (meters to tens of meters vertical) as well as suprastratal deformation, expressed by folds, faults (reverse and normal), and intense fracturing for tens to hundreds of feet above the collapsed evaporite bed. The Edwards limestone roadcuts along I-10, just east of Junction, Texas, contain excellent examples of an evaporite collapse system where the Kirschberg evaporite was dissolved. We will be able to view the undeformed beds below, the breccias and fills within, and the abundant and spectacular structural deformation above the former evaporite section. This well-exposed evaporite system is an excellent analog for both hydrocarbon reservoirs and ground-water aquifers in carbonates. The fieldtrip is physically easy, as we will be stopping along roadcuts. One walk of up to 1000 ft is required at one stop.

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The Austin Geological Society began in April 1965 when a small group of geologists met to promote better professional communication among the geologists in the Austin area.

Click here to learn more about our organization.


 
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